Tennessee is a beautiful land divided into three distinct regions: the majestic mountains of the Blue Ridge area to the east, the rolling hills of the west, and the rich fertile farm lands of the central province. The climate of most of this southern state is classified as humid subtropical—with hot summers and mild winters— making it a fitting land for agriculture.

According to the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture’s (NASDA) Tennessee profile, 42 percent of Tennessee, or nearly 11 million acres, is farmland. Tennessee agriculture generates over $3 billion in farm cash receipts each year, not including timber.

Eastern Tennessee Crops

With the heavily forested areas of the east, timber is a main “crop” in the eastern side of the state. According to the NASDA, timber sales generate about $300 million a year, making Tennessee a leader in the production of hardwood lumber.

Top crops in Central Tennessee

Central Tennessee hosts a number of crops. Tobacco is one common top crop in the middle of the state, and Tennessee is ranked third in the country in tobacco production, according to the USDA’s 2012 Census.

Crops in Western Tennessee

Soybeans are the top crop in Tennessee and the leading state’s top agricultural export; the majority of soybeans are grown in western Tennessee. Nationwide, Tennessee is 17th in soybean production. Western Tennessee also grows a lot of cotton, making Tennessee the 6th in cotton production in the nation. Furthermore, while winter wheat is grown all over the state, counties in the west of the state grow the most.

Like many states, agriculture is one of Tennessee’s main industries. As land loan specialists, we provide ag loan support to growers and ranchers of Tennessee’s agriculture industry and across the nation. With our farm ag loans, we help our clients grow and succeed with our low interest rates, long amortizations, and outstanding 10-year line of credit.

To learn more about Tennessee land loans, click here.

To calculate your ag loan, click here.

Photo by Mark Goebel




Share This :