‘Tis the season for turkey!

As such, here are some turkey farming facts to recognize the Thanksgiving bird.

  • Most turkeys consume a strict diet consisting of corn and soybean. Oftentimes, some vitamins or antibiotics are incorporated in the feed to ward off sickness.
  • Not only do turkeys stick to strict diets, but they must also be trained to consume small meals. If not trained, they will stuff themselves. The training technique is simple. When fed, extra care is taken to shake some feed into their feed trough or to gently stir up the poults (baby turkeys). Eventually, the young turkeys will learn to associate activity with food.
  • Local or store-bought? There are two variants of bird: fresh or injected. The big difference between the locally farmed variant and your store-bought, typically frozen type is that the frozen turkeys are injected with a saline-oil solution to add more bulk to the bird. The injected version renders a juicer bird, most of which, however, is water that disappears once you start cooking up the bird.
  • Fresh birds, though more expensive (especially Amish turkeys), cook about 20 percent faster. The flavor is arguably the same in both birds despite the differences.
  • Best breed? The broad breasted white turkey is the trendy turkey of the poultry industry. You might be wondering: well, why’s that? The broad breasted white turkey, as the name suggests, has a large breast muscle, which meets the consumer demand for turkey breast meat.

Poultry facilities are popular, ever-growing operations across the U.S. The construction and/or purchase of a modern poultry facility, however, is an expensive investment; thus, choosing an ag lending company who understands the poultry industry, and the agricultural industry at-large, is crucial. AgAmerica is strongly committed to agriculture and to poultry lending. For those qualifying borrowers who seek a knowledgeable and committed team of ag loan experts, we can and will offer you the very best when it comes to agriculture loans.