Discover how U.S. growers prepare for winter farming

December 21 marks the first day of winter and the beginning of winter farming for growers and producers across the U.S.

Farmers prepare for winter in many different ways, but for most, winter farm preparation means ensuring livestock have warm, dry, safe places to stay throughout the season to maintain their body temperature; carefully checking farm vehicles and equipment, and performing maintenance tasks if necessary; and reviewing data and market trends, pricing structures and crop demand, in order to plan for a successful and profitable future.

Other activities to perform when preparing your farm for winter as recommended by Steve Cain, Purdue Extension Disaster Communication Specialist, include:

  • Review crop insurance to determine what is and is not covered as harsh or hazardous weather may be on the way;
  • Clear away any debris that could become hidden under snow and ice, and could create safety issues for humans and/or livestock; and
  • Have a disaster plan and supply kit ready, with supplies including drinking water, medications, food, a can opener, first-aid kit, battery-powered radio, flashlight, extra batteries, and a portable generator.

Farming in cold climates can also mean caring for cold climate crops. Wondering what’s on the winter crops list? Winter farming crops include broad beans, asparagus, peas and pea shoots, garlic, onions, spring onions and shallots, winter lettuce and more.

In addition, some farmers choose to grow broccoli and radishes during the winter months as they tend to thrive in chilly temperatures, along with crops like Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard, cauliflower, and kale.

Regardless of the season, AgAmerica Lending is here to help you with the right financing for your operation. Contact us today to learn more about how our industry-unique 10-year line of credit could provide you the necessary operating capital to set your operation on the path to success in any season.